Posts Tagged ‘Dubbing’

Horsing Around by Russ Forney

Horsing Around by Russ Forney

Horse hair is one of Wyoming’s most abundant natural resources. Coal, oil, and natural gas are the media darlings, but horse hair is everywhere in the Cowboy State. To a fly tier, it would be a shame to waste all that beautiful long hair when it looks so good wrapped around a fly hook. It […]

Tying the MK Stone by Aileen Ellis

Tying the MK Stone by Aileen Ellis

At Hatches Magazine, we’re always on the lookout for unique or innovative fly tying techniques, but especially, new talent. We found Aileen Ellis via the Fly Flinger’s Pattern Swap group on Facebook. While it was Aileen’s tying ability that first attracted us to her, we have also learned that she is a very talented artist as well. In the article below, Aillen shares how she ties her MK Stonefly Nymph.

The Irresistable Stimulator by Charlie Dickson

The Irresistable Stimulator by Charlie Dickson

The thermometer outside my window reads 13 degrees Fahrenheit as I write this. And winter has been harder than usual this year, wind, cold, ice and snow. It has all been heavier than the norm. More and more, I look upon weather like this and say to myself that it’s fly tying season in my […]

Widow Angel Variant by John Driscoll

Widow Angel Variant by John Driscoll

This fly is a variation of a pike fly pattern tied by Simon Graham called a Widow Angel.  As you will see, the body of the fly is created by using a split-string dubbing technique.  It is for this reason that I like to go with Danville’s 210 denier Flat Waxed Nylon thread when tying […]

The Chubby Muffin by Nick Granato

The Chubby Muffin by Nick Granato

The Chubby Muffin is a sculpin imitation which uses a craft fur dubbing brush for the head. Craft fur is inexpensive, comes in a large variety of colors, and takes markers well. But more importantly, it has a neutral buoyancy after being soaked through.

Tying the Stud by Loren Williams

Tying the Stud by Loren Williams

What’s the saying? Necessity is the mother of invention? This little bug fits in there somewhere. I had been searching my creative place for a very simple to tie, light colored nymph that offered just a bit of that “ooohhhh yyyeah!” look when wet. The typical light colored dubbings, quills, biots, and threads just weren’t doing what I had in my mind. I wanted sexy, not cute.

Pressured fish see lots of cute!

The Ragin’ Craven by Charlie Craven

The Ragin’ Craven by Charlie Craven

The Ragin’ Craven was originally developed as a permit fly that could be fished both on the drop and the retrieve. See, most permit flies are to be dropped in front of the fish, and act like a crab as they drop, but lack the movement and profile to entice a grab after the fly hits the bottom. I have never had a permit eat a fly once it touched the bottom, although they generally will eyeball the hell out if it and it gets a bit frustrating. Therefore, I went to work to come up with a fly that would drop like a crab pattern, but then have the movement and profile to morph into a shrimp or other flats critter once on the bottom, allowing the angler a chance to move the fly without blowing his cover. The Ragin’ is my answer.

Flower Power: Flies From the Garden by Russ Forney

Flower Power: Flies From the Garden by Russ Forney

Have you ever been ambushed by an idea? Not a mere suggestion or nagging intuition, but a full force, frontal assault of the psyche. Somewhere in our move to Wyoming four years ago and while exploring the surrounding hills, I was smitten by the notion of dying fly tying materials with flower pigments. The relentless “what if” that plagues an otherwise sound mind propelled excursions to identify, collect, and extract pigments from wildflowers. It is hard to grasp the logic of such behavior as it may not exist; the idea just showed up one day and would not be persuaded to leave.

Selective Trout by Carl Richards & Doug Swisher, Illustrated by Dave Whitlock

Selective Trout by Carl Richards & Doug Swisher, Illustrated by Dave Whitlock

One of the most essential yet seemingly simple aspects of creating a deadly pattern is size. This is especially true for the smaller flies, those less than 7 or 8 mm in length. If, for example, we are trying to imitate a natural that is 5 mm long and our artificial ends up being 6 mm long, we are a whopping 20 percent too large. One millimeter does not sound like much, but it can mean the difference between success and failure, particularly when diminutive patterns are used.

Biot Body CDC Comparadun by John Terje Refsahl

Biot Body CDC Comparadun by John Terje Refsahl

There is nothing more fun in fly tying than putting a new twist on an old pattern. And that’s just what we have here, with a step-by-step tutorial by JohnTerje Refsahl of Norway on a Biot Body, CDC Comparadun. Al Caucci, Bob Nastasi, and maybe even Fran Betters, would be proud.

Brassed Off by Dave Wiltshire

Brassed Off by Dave Wiltshire

Love it or hate it, the inevitable need to go deeper and find the fish, is married with the arrival of colder (and often wetter) weather.  Whilst it may not be the dry-fly fishers’ idea of fun, big and heavy, lead-packed nymphs are often the answer.  Fished in a variety of styles, they can be […]

Underwire Support: The Secret to a Shapely Body by Russ Forney

Underwire Support: The Secret to a Shapely Body by Russ Forney

Sorry Victoria, the secret is out: underwire support is the key to a flattering figure. Strategically placed and properly fashioned, short segments of wire are an excellent foundation for the broad, flattened abdomen characteristic of large nymphs. The shapely bulk of underbody wire makes an attractive chassis for subsurface flies, providing just the right visual […]

Ants: When little things mean a lot by Russ Forney

Ants: When little things mean a lot by Russ Forney

Terrestrial insects are among the most prolific “hatches” on most trout streams and ants are particularly plentiful throughout the summer. While mayflies, stones, and caddis come and go in their seasons, ants are available for months at a time and fish feed regularly on these little morsels. Ant patterns are easy to tie and fish […]

The Foundations of Tying Spiders by Dave Wiltshire

The Foundations of Tying Spiders by Dave Wiltshire

variation1 How many times have you been asked to consider the question ‘What is your favourite fly?’ An impossible one to answer because it depends on so many factors. My favourite fly is the one that best matches the fish’s food type at the specific time; obviously the one that will catch the fish. That’s a cheating answer though I suppose. However, there is another way to look at the posed question. ‘Which fly would you least want to be without?’

The Jointed Hex by Matt Erny

The Jointed Hex by Matt Erny

Step 1: Tie 3/0 thread to #10 long bend nymph hook. Step 2: Tie on a Pheasant rump feather or a pheasant marabou feather, leaving it long enough to overhang the hook bend by half the length of the hook. Step 3: Tie on a Pheasant under-fluff feather (See Hex gill pic.) Step 4: Add […]

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