Posts Tagged ‘Golden Pheasant Tippet’

Ray Bergman Collection – 132) Golden Pheasant

Ray Bergman Collection – 132) Golden Pheasant

Tip: Gold tinsel Tail: Black hackle fibers * Ribbing: Gold tinsel Body: Orange floss Hackle: Black Wing: Golden pheasant tippet, back-to-back * I have tied this fly using black quill sections instead of fibers for the tail; though a personal choice, it produces a sharper appearance and profile.

Ray Bergman Collection – 123) Good Evening

Ray Bergman Collection – 123) Good Evening

Tip: None Tail: Golden pheasant tippet Ribbing: Gold tinsel Body: Scarlet floss or wool Hackle: Brown Wing: Dark blue – white tip (such as from mallard wing. * * This sample of the Good Evening was tied using whole white duck quill sections underneath shorter dark blue mallard, because oftentimes the iridescent blue mallard feathers […]

The Ray Bergman Collection – 41) Bog Pond

The Ray Bergman Collection – 41)	Bog Pond

Tip: None Tail: Golden pheasant tippet Ribbing: None Body: Black chenille Hackle: Grizzly Wing: Brown pheasant (or turkey) * * See the Artful Dodger notes regarding the substitution of turkey for the pheasant wing.

The Ray Bergman Collection – 37) Blue Jay

The Ray Bergman Collection – 37)	Blue Jay

Tip: Gold tinsel Tail: Golden pheasant tippet Ribbing: Gold tinsel Body: Orange floss Hackle: Orange Wing: European blue jay * * On the Blue Jay, Bergman’s wing recipe simply calls for ‘blue jay’ but the appearance of the paintings on this and the jay-winged flies on Plate No. 4 reveal these wing feathers are obtained […]

The Ray Bergman Collection – 1) Abbey

The Ray Bergman Collection – 1) Abbey

Tip: Gold tinsel Tail: Golden pheasant tippet Ribbing: Gold tinsel Body: Dark red floss Hackle: Red (light brown) Wing: Gray mallard The Abbey is identical to the Kingfisher except for the dark red floss body called for on the Abbey compared to a crimson floss body on the Kingfisher.

The Adams: History Revisited by Tom Deschaine

The Adams: History Revisited by Tom Deschaine

The story of the Adams begins just 12 miles south of Traverse City, Michigan, off County Road 611 in the small township of Mayfield. It was here, in 1922, at the Mayfield Pond where Leonard Halladay created the famous Adams fly.

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