Posts Tagged ‘Ostrich’

The Ray Bergman Collection – 2) Academy

The Ray Bergman Collection – 2) Academy

Tip: Red floss * Tail: Crimson hackle fibers Ribbing: None Body: Peacock herl Hackle: Brown Wing: Claret Tips, Tags, and Butts * The red floss ‘tip’ on the Academy is actually positioned as a ‘butt’ in front of, and at the base of the tail in Dr. Burke’s painting. The Academy is the first of […]

Talking Turkey to a Trout by Russ Forney

Talking Turkey to a Trout by Russ Forney

“Talking turkey” is an old idiom referring to a candid discussion. In present use the phrase denotes a matter of business, a factual and straightforward approach to problem solving. This contemporary definition works just fine, unless you are a fly fisherman.

Opening Days by Richard Chiappone

Opening Days by Richard Chiappone

The following is an excerpt from the book, Opening Days, by Richard Chiaponne. It is from the chapter titled, “Perfect: A Fly Tier’s Beginnings.”

Spring Olives by Russ Forney

Spring Olives by Russ Forney

Sand Creek is a pretty little piece of trout water that harbors some very fussy fish. Clear water in a small creek demands a quiet approach; casting from the bank is a good strategy when fishing small flies to springtime trout. Photo by Russ Forney Springtime in Wyoming can be pretty elusive. Just when the […]

Horsing Around by Russ Forney

Horsing Around by Russ Forney

Horse hair is one of Wyoming’s most abundant natural resources. Coal, oil, and natural gas are the media darlings, but horse hair is everywhere in the Cowboy State. To a fly tier, it would be a shame to waste all that beautiful long hair when it looks so good wrapped around a fly hook. It […]

Widow Angel Variant by John Driscoll

Widow Angel Variant by John Driscoll

This fly is a variation of a pike fly pattern tied by Simon Graham called a Widow Angel.  As you will see, the body of the fly is created by using a split-string dubbing technique.  It is for this reason that I like to go with Danville’s 210 denier Flat Waxed Nylon thread when tying […]

Selective Trout by Carl Richards & Doug Swisher, Illustrated by Dave Whitlock

Selective Trout by Carl Richards & Doug Swisher, Illustrated by Dave Whitlock

One of the most essential yet seemingly simple aspects of creating a deadly pattern is size. This is especially true for the smaller flies, those less than 7 or 8 mm in length. If, for example, we are trying to imitate a natural that is 5 mm long and our artificial ends up being 6 mm long, we are a whopping 20 percent too large. One millimeter does not sound like much, but it can mean the difference between success and failure, particularly when diminutive patterns are used.

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