Posts Tagged ‘Russ Forney’

Hatches 2011: Emerging Patterns – Tying the Missing Link by Russ Forney

Hatches 2011: Emerging Patterns – Tying the Missing Link by Russ Forney

For some, a flurry of mayflies hovering over the water is the initial sign of a hatch. In reality, though, insect activity might have been churning frenetically below the water’s surface for many hours before. Emergence begins well before the first dun pops off the water, and so does some of the most productive fishing. […]

End-of-the-Day Flies by Russ Forney

End-of-the-Day Flies by Russ Forney

Who knew trash was good for the soul? I am amazed how quickly bits of fluff, feathers, hair, and thread fill the nylon bag fastened to my tying bench. Odds and ends clipped from flies tied earlier in the day now litter the waste bag – a fuzzy mound of scraps and snippets that marks […]

Talking Turkey to a Trout by Russ Forney

Talking Turkey to a Trout by Russ Forney

“Talking turkey” is an old idiom referring to a candid discussion. In present use the phrase denotes a matter of business, a factual and straightforward approach to problem solving. This contemporary definition works just fine, unless you are a fly fisherman.

Spring Olives by Russ Forney

Spring Olives by Russ Forney

Sand Creek is a pretty little piece of trout water that harbors some very fussy fish. Clear water in a small creek demands a quiet approach; casting from the bank is a good strategy when fishing small flies to springtime trout. Photo by Russ Forney Springtime in Wyoming can be pretty elusive. Just when the […]

Hatches 2010: Beads: Tying with Light by Russ Forney

Hatches 2010: Beads: Tying with Light by Russ Forney

An artist’s palette is a gateway to a world of infinite possibility. Skillfully blended colors express mood and vitality, bringing imagination to life well before a brush ever touches the canvas. An evolving composition grows from the palette—the origin of color, form, and light. Fly tiers also wield a palette of colors and textures. Fur, […]

Horsing Around by Russ Forney

Horsing Around by Russ Forney

Horse hair is one of Wyoming’s most abundant natural resources. Coal, oil, and natural gas are the media darlings, but horse hair is everywhere in the Cowboy State. To a fly tier, it would be a shame to waste all that beautiful long hair when it looks so good wrapped around a fly hook. It […]

Flower Power: Flies From the Garden by Russ Forney

Flower Power: Flies From the Garden by Russ Forney

Have you ever been ambushed by an idea? Not a mere suggestion or nagging intuition, but a full force, frontal assault of the psyche. Somewhere in our move to Wyoming four years ago and while exploring the surrounding hills, I was smitten by the notion of dying fly tying materials with flower pigments. The relentless “what if” that plagues an otherwise sound mind propelled excursions to identify, collect, and extract pigments from wildflowers. It is hard to grasp the logic of such behavior as it may not exist; the idea just showed up one day and would not be persuaded to leave.

Underwire Support: The Secret to a Shapely Body by Russ Forney

Underwire Support: The Secret to a Shapely Body by Russ Forney

Sorry Victoria, the secret is out: underwire support is the key to a flattering figure. Strategically placed and properly fashioned, short segments of wire are an excellent foundation for the broad, flattened abdomen characteristic of large nymphs. The shapely bulk of underbody wire makes an attractive chassis for subsurface flies, providing just the right visual […]

Triggers, Tiers and Trout by Russ Forney

Triggers, Tiers and Trout by Russ Forney

Fly tiers invariably pose that question when first introduced to emerger patterns; scruffy bodies, curved hooks, and jumbled appendages are bewildering to the uninitiated. The apprehension is understandable; emergence is a dynamic process in the life cycle stage of aquatic insects and requires equally dynamic imitations to fool wary trout. Emergers are neither nymphs nor […]

Ants: When little things mean a lot by Russ Forney

Ants: When little things mean a lot by Russ Forney

Terrestrial insects are among the most prolific “hatches” on most trout streams and ants are particularly plentiful throughout the summer. While mayflies, stones, and caddis come and go in their seasons, ants are available for months at a time and fish feed regularly on these little morsels. Ant patterns are easy to tie and fish […]

Six Thousand Flies by Russ Forney and Tim Scott

Six Thousand Flies by Russ Forney and Tim Scott

How long does it take to tie 6,000 flies? Grab a calculator and run the numbers: tying at a sustained rate of 10 flies per hour for 15 hours a day, you would need 40 days to tie that many flies. If you bumped production to 15 flies an hour, you could shave almost two weeks off the timeline. No problem, just take a month off from work, family, and fishing; and hope all three are still there when you reemerge. Needless to say, 6,000 flies is a tall order for even the most enthusiastic tier.

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