Posts Tagged ‘Tan’

Hendrickson Soft Hackle

Hendrickson Soft Hackle

A very easy soft hackle pattern that I like to fish during the Hendrickson hatches both prior to, during and while spinners are falling. This particular fly can be altered in size and color for any mayfly hatch not just the Hendrickson Mayfly, so experiment and find what works for you. Materials You Will Need […]

The Adams: History Revisited by Tom Deschaine

The Adams: History Revisited by Tom Deschaine

The story of the Adams begins just 12 miles south of Traverse City, Michigan, off County Road 611 in the small township of Mayfield. It was here, in 1922, at the Mayfield Pond where Leonard Halladay created the famous Adams fly.

Product Spotlight: Singlebarbed’s Sixth Finger Scissors

Product Spotlight: Singlebarbed’s Sixth Finger Scissors

Hatches is pleased to announce the arrival of Singlebarbed’s Sixth Finger Scissors to the Hatches Store!  These surgical-grade stainless steel fly tying scissors are designed to remain in the hand for the duration of the tying session. One over-sized finger hole allows the scissor to be worn like a wedding ring at the base of […]

Count Chocula Mouse by Michael Rowland

Count Chocula Mouse by Michael Rowland

Growing up in Michigan, I learned to love fishing at night with mice patterns. It wasn’t until I moved out west that I realized how versatile these flies can be. Now, I always carry a few just in case- or if I have too much to drink and need something to keep my attention during […]

Tangled Up in Blue by LeVern “Vern-O” Burm

Tangled Up in Blue by LeVern “Vern-O” Burm

As a fly tier and a devoted steelheader, I encounter many new trends and “must have” flies. I am not one of those guys who have two different patterns in a couple of colors and sizes in his fly boxes. I have at best, two of each pattern, a multitude of colors, shapes and sizes, […]

The Irresistable Stimulator by Charlie Dickson

The Irresistable Stimulator by Charlie Dickson

The thermometer outside my window reads 13 degrees Fahrenheit as I write this. And winter has been harder than usual this year, wind, cold, ice and snow. It has all been heavier than the norm. More and more, I look upon weather like this and say to myself that it’s fly tying season in my […]

Wet Fly Heads by Mike Schmidt

Wet Fly Heads by Mike Schmidt

Through the years I’ve spent fly fishing and fly tying, I have seen a whole lot of flies. Having an art background I have found that I tend to look at all of them with a critical eye; noting each small hard fought victory at the vise as well as their imperfections. Over time I […]

Widow Angel Variant by John Driscoll

Widow Angel Variant by John Driscoll

This fly is a variation of a pike fly pattern tied by Simon Graham called a Widow Angel.  As you will see, the body of the fly is created by using a split-string dubbing technique.  It is for this reason that I like to go with Danville’s 210 denier Flat Waxed Nylon thread when tying […]

The Chubby Muffin by Nick Granato

The Chubby Muffin by Nick Granato

The Chubby Muffin is a sculpin imitation which uses a craft fur dubbing brush for the head. Craft fur is inexpensive, comes in a large variety of colors, and takes markers well. But more importantly, it has a neutral buoyancy after being soaked through.

The Dirty Rat by Jackie Treehorn

The Dirty Rat by Jackie Treehorn

A few summers ago, I noticed a small mouse swimming in my pool. He struggled and fought for dear life, nose barely breaking the surface, legs churning like it was on a hamster wheel. I was inspired by his heroic efforts and chose to create a fly that mimicked his final death dance. Most mouse […]

Tying the Stud by Loren Williams

Tying the Stud by Loren Williams

What’s the saying? Necessity is the mother of invention? This little bug fits in there somewhere. I had been searching my creative place for a very simple to tie, light colored nymph that offered just a bit of that “ooohhhh yyyeah!” look when wet. The typical light colored dubbings, quills, biots, and threads just weren’t doing what I had in my mind. I wanted sexy, not cute.

Pressured fish see lots of cute!

The Ragin’ Craven by Charlie Craven

The Ragin’ Craven by Charlie Craven

The Ragin’ Craven was originally developed as a permit fly that could be fished both on the drop and the retrieve. See, most permit flies are to be dropped in front of the fish, and act like a crab as they drop, but lack the movement and profile to entice a grab after the fly hits the bottom. I have never had a permit eat a fly once it touched the bottom, although they generally will eyeball the hell out if it and it gets a bit frustrating. Therefore, I went to work to come up with a fly that would drop like a crab pattern, but then have the movement and profile to morph into a shrimp or other flats critter once on the bottom, allowing the angler a chance to move the fly without blowing his cover. The Ragin’ is my answer.

Flower Power: Flies From the Garden by Russ Forney

Flower Power: Flies From the Garden by Russ Forney

Have you ever been ambushed by an idea? Not a mere suggestion or nagging intuition, but a full force, frontal assault of the psyche. Somewhere in our move to Wyoming four years ago and while exploring the surrounding hills, I was smitten by the notion of dying fly tying materials with flower pigments. The relentless “what if” that plagues an otherwise sound mind propelled excursions to identify, collect, and extract pigments from wildflowers. It is hard to grasp the logic of such behavior as it may not exist; the idea just showed up one day and would not be persuaded to leave.

Fly Tyers of the World: Volume III

Fly Tyers of the World: Volume III

The Fly Tyers of the World series (see excerpts from vol. 3 below) is a stunning new series of casebound, limited edition, numbered books designed and photographed by Steve Thornton.  Broken up into 5 volumes, Fly Tyers of the World offers a unique and personal insight into 100 of the world’s best known fly tyers […]

Selective Trout by Carl Richards & Doug Swisher, Illustrated by Dave Whitlock

Selective Trout by Carl Richards & Doug Swisher, Illustrated by Dave Whitlock

One of the most essential yet seemingly simple aspects of creating a deadly pattern is size. This is especially true for the smaller flies, those less than 7 or 8 mm in length. If, for example, we are trying to imitate a natural that is 5 mm long and our artificial ends up being 6 mm long, we are a whopping 20 percent too large. One millimeter does not sound like much, but it can mean the difference between success and failure, particularly when diminutive patterns are used.

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